TTL Cover 3For most of my teaching career, I’ve been teaching my special needs high school students strategies to enable them to help themselves to graduate from high school. I’m always extra proud of my special needs students  when they walk across the stage at graduation and receive their high school diploma. They’ve made it. They’re ready for the next phase of their lives.  But are they? Are they really ready for the next phase of  their lives as start up adults  simply because they’ve earned a high school diploma? 

Susan Traugh a mom of a special needs student and an advocate for special needs teens and their teachers recognized from personal experience simply because students graduate from high school they aren’t necessarily well prepared for life after school.  Susan wrote Transition 2 Life  to help teachers help their students better prepare themselves for life after high school.  I think Transition 2 Life is an excellent resource because it helps students develop the practical skills they need in an engaging way to successfully navigate their way through their daily lives.

I invited Susan to tell us about herself because I think Transition 2 Life is an excellent resource to help students better prepare themselves for life.

 

Susan Traugh- author of Transition 2 Life

Like so many parents of special needs teens, I was frantically fighting to help my son get through his high school classes so he could graduate and get a diploma.  Matt was really struggling to pass his math and science classes and my husband and I spent many hours every night trying to eek out those last few test points that might put him over the top.  Housework was secondary to homework, and we didn’t push him to get a job or do much community service as we put all our energy into class work.

When he graduated, we were ecstatic and felt like a major hurdle had been crossed.  And it had.  But as the weeks and months passed after high school, we realized that, while Algebra was important to get that diploma, balancing a check book or being able to read a map in order to drive to the bank were much more important in life.  And, we found that we’d been so focused ON graduation that we hadn’t supplied him with the life skills he’d need AFTER graduation.

Matt’s special education teacher also had a son Matt’s age and realized she, too, had focused on class work to the exclusion of life work.  So, we set out together to find a life skills program to help our boys.  As we looked, we found that programs were either written for teachers with lots of theory and educational jargon, or they were written for “children” without respect for a teen’s maturity and sensibilities.  The more we looked, the more dissatisfied we became.

But, the real impetus for action came with one frantic phone call.  I picked up the phone to hear Matt’s panicked voice.  His brain injury had destroyed the spatial skills center of his brain and made it hard for him to keep “a map” in his head.  We’d gotten him a GPS and he’d agreed to only drive within our city.  We thought we were covered.

But, on this night his GPS had failed. Matt had tried to find his way home and, when he got turned around, panicked and ended up making a left-hand turn into oncoming traffic.  When he called, he was stopped in the middle of the street, facing the wrong way.  He knew he was close to home (less than one-half mile away) but didn’t know how to get there.  I had him pull into a parking lot to calm down then talked him all the way home.

I called Matt’s teacher the next day and began writing my own curriculum.

Transition 2 Life was developed to give mild-to-moderately affected special needs teens a program that they can work on independently, modify to their own needs and then walk away with a portfolio that they can use during the first few years of their young adult life to navigate that transition.  Written on a third-grade reading level, it has light, airy pages with lots of bullet points and a font and pictures selected by the students who piloted the program.  And because I know how hard Matt’s teacher works each day, the program is teacher-friendly, with built-in grading sheets, federally mandated goals tied to the lesson plans and pre-printed parent letters so she can let folks know how they can help their teens at home.

Units include lessons on understanding their own Individual Education Plan (IEP), learning styles and career aptitude, writing resumes and business letters, using an ATM machine and balancing a budget, filling out job and college applications, advocating for themselves, and answering the phone.

And, yes, there’s a unit on transportation and how to get around in your home town…or around the country.

The program has been enthusiastically accepted here in California and, in fact, teacher requests have prompted us to write another series, called Daily Living Skills, which creates more in-depth units on basic adult skills such as grocery shopping, house cleaning or meal planning.  All books are sold at: www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Susan-Traugh.

It’s hard keeping all the plates spinning when you’re the parent (or teacher) of a special needs student.  Things that other parents can take for granted must be taught, and taught thoroughly, to our kids.  But, there are rewards.

Matt just took a 600 mile road trip with his sister to Utah.  Before he left, he came to go over the map and verify he knew the directions.  But, after reassuring himself, they got into the car, full of smiles and self-confidence, and went on their way.  Now, that’s a life skill.

For most of my teaching career, I’ve been teaching my special needs high school students strategies to enable them to help themselves to graduate from high school. I’m always extra proud of them when they walk across the stage at graduation and receive their high school diploma. They’ve made it. They’re ready for the next phase of their life.  But are they? Are they really ready for the next stage of life simply because they’ve earned a high school diploma? 

 

Susan Traugh a mom of a special needs student and an advocate for special needs teens and their teachers recognized from personal experience simply because students graduate from high school they aren’t necessarily well prepared for life after school.  To help teachers help students better prepare themselves for life after high school, Susan wrote Transition 2 Life.  I think it is an excellent resource because it helps students develop the practical skills they need to successfully navigate their way through their daily lives

 

I invited Susan to tell us about herself because I think Transition 2 Life is an excellent resource to help students better prepare themselves for life after high school.

 

Susan Traugh- author of Transition 2 Life

 

Like so many parents of special needs teens, I was frantically fighting to help my son get through his high school classes so he could graduate and get a diploma.  Matt was really struggling to pass his math and science classes and my husband and I spent many hours every night trying to eek out those last few test points that might put him over the top.  Housework was secondary to homework, and we didn’t push him to get a job or do much community service as we put all our energy into class work.

            When he graduated, we were ecstatic and felt like a major hurdle had been crossed.  And it had.  But as the weeks and months passed after high school, we realized that, while Algebra was important to get that diploma, balancing a check book or being able to read a map in order to drive to the bank were much more important in life.  And, we found that we’d been so focused ON graduation that we hadn’t supplied him with the life skills he’d need AFTER graduation.

Matt’s special education teacher also had a son Matt’s age and realized she, too, had focused on class work to the exclusion of life work.  So, we set out together to find a life skills program to help our boys.  As we looked, we found that programs were either written for teachers with lots of theory and educational jargon, or they were written for “children” without respect for a teen’s maturity and sensibilities.  The more we looked, the more dissatisfied we became.

            But, the real impetus for action came with one frantic phone call.  I picked up the phone to hear Matt’s panicked voice.  His brain injury had destroyed the spatial skills center of his brain and made it hard for him to keep “a map” in his head.  We’d gotten him a GPS and he’d agreed to only drive within our city.  We thought we were covered.

            But, on this night his GPS had failed. Matt had tried to find his way home and, when he got turned around, panicked and ended up making a left-hand turn into oncoming traffic.  When he called, he was stopped in the middle of the street, facing the wrong way.  He knew he was close to home (less than one-half mile away) but didn’t know how to get there.  I had him pull into a parking lot to calm down then talked him all the way home.

            I called Matt’s teacher the next day and began writing my own curriculum.

            Transition 2 Life was developed to give mild-to-moderately affected special needs teens a program that they can work on independently, modify to their own needs and then walk away with a portfolio that they can use during the first few years of their young adult life to navigate that transition.  Written on a third-grade reading level, it has light, airy pages with lots of bullet points and a font and pictures selected by the students who piloted the program.  And because I know how hard Matt’s teacher works each day, the program is teacher-friendly, with built-in grading sheets, federally mandated goals tied to the lesson plans and pre-printed parent letters so she can let folks know how they can help their teens at home.

            Units include lessons on understanding their own Individual Education Plan (IEP), learning styles and career aptitude, writing resumes and business letters, using an ATM machine and balancing a budget, filling out job and college applications, advocating for themselves, and answering the phone. 

And, yes, there’s a unit on transportation and how to get around in your home town…or around the country.

The program has been enthusiastically accepted here in California and, in fact, teacher requests have prompted us to write another series, called Daily Living Skills, which creates more in-depth units on basic adult skills such as grocery shopping, house cleaning or meal planning.  All books are sold at: www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Susan-Traugh.

It’s hard keeping all the plates spinning when you’re the parent (or teacher) of a special needs student.  Things that other parents can take for granted must be taught, and taught thoroughly, to our kids.  But, there are rewards. 

Matt just took a 600 mile road trip with his sister to Utah.  Before he left, he came to go over the map and verify he knew the directions.  But, after reassuring himself, they got into the car, full of smiles and self-confidence, and went on their way.  Now, that’s a life skill.

           

When I have students complete the their learning plans to prepare for evaluations, I review learning styles because I want them to be efficient in preparing for their evaluations. Many students are visual learners so the following chart would be helpful in reminding students what strategies to use for each learning style. I encourage students to use all learning styles and to continue to develop their less preferred learning styles. I tell my students learning styles are pathways to the brain so the more pathways you use, the better the results.

What Type of Learner Are You?
Compiled By: OnlineCollege.org

Student preparing for exams

Student preparing for exams (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It’s the second week of June  and that means it’s time for students to start to prepare for final exams.  A recent study found 84 percent  of students prepare for tests and exams by rereading  the material.  Fifty-five percent of students in the study believe rereading material was the best way to prepare for tests and exams. But,rereading material  proved not to be the best way to prepare for exams. The most successful way to prepare for exams is quizzing.   Yet, only 11 percent of  students reported they quizzed themselves to prepare for tests and exams. Students who used quizzing  as a study strategy  correctly answered 65 percent of questions taken directly from text and 70 percent of questions that required inference and making connections across concepts. That is an increase of 10 percent for direct questions and a 10 percent increase for inference questions.

A 10 percent increase is significant.  I would be absolutely delighted if my students could demonstrate a 10 percent increase in their learning. In the past, I have encouraged students to create quizzes about the material as part of their study plan. But, some students were not convinced it was worth the effort.  Now, I have data to share with students  to  support the contention that creating quizzes is a successful study practice.

I encourage my students to create a learning or study plan because  it makes them responsible for preparing for exams and gives them a sense of being in control of the process. They can differentiate their study strategy to suit their individual learning preferences and strengths.

 

The plan includes the following headings

  1. What I need to know;
  2.  When am I going to study;
  3. How am I going to organize what I need to know;
  4. How am I going to remember what I need to know;
  5. How will I know I have learned the material I need to know.

 

If you like, I can email you a copy of the handout. Just leave a request in the comment box below.  I’d be delighted to share my learning plan with you.  students have told me it is helpful and have gone on to use it at college.

 

 

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I want my students to reflect on how well or how poorly they prepared for tests. I want my students to think about being better prepared for their next test. Often, they don’t prepare at all beyond the review for the test I do in class. I see this happening all the time. I think my students may intend to prepare for the test, but when they leave my classroom they leave their intentions behind. I’m hoping the test reflection handout I have them complete will encourage them to remember to prepare for the next test. I’m thinking that maybe after completing a half dozen or so of these reflections, the idea of preparing for the next test will stick in their mind. Now that I’m telling you about my plan, I think I might even have them reflect on their quiz preparation as well. Then the idea of preparing should be deeply embedded in their minds and they will remember to prepare. Here’s a copy of the reflection handout.

I have tried to use kid friendly language, you can change it to suit your purposes. Also, this reflection was about a math test ; you can change it to suit your purposes.

Test Reflection Sheet

Name: ________________________________  Date:______________________

How do you feel about your performance on this test? (circle one)

Awesome!!                   Cool                        Lame                                       Get Real

Do you think  you demonstrated what you knew about the topic on this test?

Why?

Why not?

How much time did you spend studying for this test?

I spent about

Days ____            Hours ____       Minutes____

studying for this test.

How much of the assigned work did you complete on this topic?

All____     Almost all_____  Some_______   Little_______

What would you do differently preparing for the next test?  Why?

What would you do the same? Why?

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